colour daze: tips for attending a wedding in Jaipur (part 1)

colour daze: tips for attending a wedding in Jaipur (part 1)

November 14, 2018

I don’t often fly across the world within a week’s notice (I might need two), but this was an exception. After receiving a last minute wedding invitation from my dear friend, Raghu, I grabbed my little sister and jumped on a plane to Jaipur, India.

I had never been to India before. Four flights later and a couple of whirlwind hours in Delhi, we found ourselves in Jaipur, “the pink city”. Between the traffic and swerving rickshaws I caught my first glimpses of the land I’ve always dreamed of visiting, the culture I’ve longed to experience, and the people I’ve been eager to meet. The next few days would prove that humans do, in fact, harbour a sixth sense perceptive of the energy emitted by colour.

THE WEDDING (PART 1)

Colour radiated from every corner; in the spices, the cloth, the food, flower petals, the saris, and turbans. Brilliant shades of magenta, and cobalt, and a yellow so bright I can only identify it as “turmeric”. The smells had colour. Of course, being from North America – where neutral colours are king – this sense was underdeveloped, and it was hard to contain myself in a setting so vibrant.

The traditional Hindu wedding consists of 7 binding rituals that have been part of the Hindu culture for centuries, extending over several days. This photo series illustrates the earliest ritual, Grahshanti/Yagopavitra Sanskar.

 

 

TIPS FOR ATTENDING A HINDU WEDDING, IN STYLE

  1. It can get hot - really hot! Pack modest (no bare shoulders, or bare knees), breathable clothing. 
  2. Clothing should also be bright and colourful - contrary to North America, your neutrals will actually make you stand out more. (Avoid bright red, as this colour is traditionally reserved for the bride.)
  3. Scrap tips 1 + 2 and buy clothing for the wedding locally! You'll meet and support local vendors, AND dress the part. It's a win-win.
    * For traditional wedding rituals, a sari or lehenga will be your go-to. I bought a lehenga for the reception portion of the ceremony - photos to come in Part 2!
  4. Be prepared for long days, so stay hydrated! 
  5. A cash gift is preferred over a boxed gift - preferably delivered in an envelope, in rupees, with the monetary amount ending in 1, as numbers ending in 1 are considered lucky (e.g. 5001 rupees).
  6. Learn the customs and rituals - its more fun if you know what's going on!

Until next time,

- Britt, Origin Travels



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